Sunday, February 3, 2008

Lazy Sunday


I learned that my ancestors came from the Steppes. They were nomads whose greatest treasure was their horses. The word for horse was “janibar”, which meant “one with soul”. I was looking at my orchid plant blooming in my kitchen window today and couldn’t help but notice that my “one with soul” was watching me.


Her mother was more interested in what was for lunch.


Siete thought that Silk’s serving of hay tasted better than hers. It reminded me of when my daughter sticks her fork in my food and says, “How come everything always looks better on your plate?”

16 comments:

Rising Rainbow said...

I thought that was an orchid I was looking at but it didn't compute with the weather you've been having. Didn't dawn on me it was inside. lol What can I say, it's been a long day........

Bill Evertson said...

While your ancestors didn't begueath horses in your dowery, they leave you with genes to appreciate Siete and Silk's lessons, which I thank God for; every-time you post.

Victoria Cummings said...

Thanks, Bill, that's very kind of you!

billie said...

Isn't it wonderful when you look out your window and one of them is looking in at you? They are so attuned to us, even with walls in between. It's no wonder our cues to them when we're riding or doing groundwork can be so subtle and finely tuned.

Grey Horse Matters said...

That's a great picture taken out of your window. It is nice to see color in the landscape again, even if its from inside. Six more weeks of winter, we can do that.

LJB said...

Victoria, I've been going to your blog since the end of December and sadly finding nothing new. Kept wondering what happened in your life that kept you from writing. Then discovered that my bookmark was taking me to that Dec entry and not to your blog home page! Oh my, what a lot I've been missing of your writings and pictures! Hello there! *g*

Gypsy at Heart said...

Agree with your daughter food always does look better on someone else's plate.

Trée said...

I love it when my wife and I go to a restaurant and when our food arrives, before she takes a single bite of her own dish, she has her fork in mine. I just bite my tongue and keep the peace. :-D

More beautiful pictures Victoria. I feel like I'm getting to know your girls. :-)

Humanus said...

What was the tribe of your ancestors?
As far as I know many nomads used their horses as a food reserve. Can you eat them?
And.. did you drink koumiss?

Callie said...

My girls were silly this morning. I fed them their grain in the loafing shed and they kept spooking each other. Silly things!

Rising Rainbow said...

Victoria, I tagged you with another one of those pesky viruses. But this one in a horse virus and actually was fun to do so hope you don't mind. Check out my blog for details.

Dee said...

I'm a homesick horse-gal trapped in the city. I love reading your blog; it's a nice fix to tide me over in the meantime.

Anonymous said...

Hey Victoria!
Im Bron from KZN in South Africa. I'm also as my friends call it horse mad! Although im not really. I could kind of say that horses are my life and I kinda couldnt live without them... Anyways Ill be leaving a lot more "comments" because I've enjoyed getting to know you and your girls..

Bron
XXX

Victoria Cummings said...

Hello Bron- I'm glad you stopped by. Being horse crazy is a great way to save your sanity. Don't let anyone discourage you. Please leave comments as often as you want. I love to get them.

Linda said...

I love the description of a horse as "one with soul"! Knowing that other people recoginized this in horses just reinforces my belief that they not only are "one with soul" but they touch my soul everytime I am around them.

Thanks for sharing this!

XAgirl said...

i love what looks like a #7 in white on the right horse. Our horses would love to play 'Switcheroo' with their hay. They ket going to the others food and eating, switching every rew minutes.