Saturday, April 18, 2009

Appreciating the Cycle


The longer I live in this place, the more I am aware of the cycle of life. This time of year brings so much re-birth, and I am remembering how it felt five years ago to move here in the Spring. I was full of expectation and constantly surprised by what was happening on this small patch of land that we now called home. Once again, this year, the daffodils and forsythia are blooming, and the irises and peonies and lily of the valley are peaking up out of the ground, getting ready to show off like girls going to the prom. The gnats and no-see-ums arrived yesterday in a massive battalion. I put the first coating of fly spray on the horses. This year, Silk doesn’t seemed to be attacked so maybe some of my preventative measures are finally working. Siete was the one they went after, poor thing. I’m back to my bug fighting regime. The fly predators are arriving in about ten days, as they do annually.

My dog, Pepper, has made it through another winter. This week, her back legs completely gave out on her so she couldn’t even stand up. Once again, we thought it was the end of the road, but the vet pulled off a small miracle. She’s been saving prescribing prednisone for this inevitable moment. With just three doses, Pepper is able to stand and walk about the way she was a month ago. It’s a huge relief to see her outside enjoying the warm weather and the sunshine. It made me realize again that you just never know. It’s the mystery of life.

The birds are laying their eggs in the nests in the barn in their usual places. I’m hoping that the bunny will come back. Our favorite little red squirrel has moved out of the tack room and back into the beech tree on the patio. We’re looking out for some babies soon. I did find a dead mouse in Silk’s water bucket this morning, but unfortunately, that’s part of the cycle around here too. It’s the joy and the sadness, and once again, nature is teaching me to roll with the punches.

Silk is back to standing at the fence, gazing longingly at the green grass growing on the other side. Siete has decided, out of the blue, that she doesn’t like it when I put fly spray on her ears, so we’re working on accepting that since it’s never been a problem before. I’m really hoping that we can have a summer without any tick emergencies. I’m planning that I will find more time to spend with Siete and even be riding her by the end of this season. One thing that I’ve learned is that it’s not worth it to get frustrated by what I can’t control. Horses take it as it comes. I think the only expectations that Silk and Siete really have revolves around when their food will be in their buckets.

So, on this lazy Saturday, I’m feeling relief at having made it through this difficult year with all my people and animals intact to enjoy another Spring, and I’m finding great pleasure in recognizing the signs that Nature gives us each April that good things are to come.

“I suppose the pleasure of country life lies really in the eternally renewed evidences of the determination to live.”
Vita Sackville West

12 comments:

Lori Skoog said...

A very nice post Victoria. It is over 60 here, but no bugs. (I am washing my fly masks as I write this). Hope you are continuing to enjoy the moment! Spring has sprung!

Kate said...

I love the cycle of the year, too. We've got great clouds of gnats already, but only a few face and stable flies.

Bill Evertson said...

Lovely thoughts for this time of year. We'll take it all including the gnats. Our dog Cleo may have over did it being outside with us yesterday. Same problem, although she has been on prednisone for a year now. Your post reminds me of all the lessons of the cycles the one to learn is humble appreciation.

deejbrown said...

The rhythm of the season is reflected in your writing. I found myself more relaxed after reading it....

detroit dog said...

This is truly a wonderful post. Life is good!

Strawberry Lane said...

Ahhhh ... birds nesting, flowers blooming, happy horses and those beautiful trees in the background.

Victoria, it sounds so absolutely blissful.

Pony Girl said...

We just ordered fly predators, too. We've never tried them before, I'm excited (sad, eh?) And I used fly spray this past weekend. Hard to believe! I'm glad Pepper is doing better. Nice post about the cycle of spring!

smrp said...

I'm so happy to hear that Pepper is still hanging in there! What an amazing dog!

Your little slice of paradise sounds so peaceful right now. Any sign of your little bunny friend?

Eagerly awaiting our fly predators, too! The little joys of pony momhood :D

Grey Horse Matters said...

I'm happy to hear the vet had a miracle in her pocket for Pepper. She's such a sweetheart, hope she's enjoying the warmth of the suns rays on good days.
Spring always makes me realize how the renewal of life's cycles seems to start with small things, the birds twittering,the bulbs blooming and hopefully your little bunny returning.
For Siete's ears have you tried putting the fly spray on a rag and rubbing it on, that might help get her over dislike of the spray. Hope her training goes well enough for you to ride her by the end of the season, that would be fun!

Callie said...

Nice post, I'm still waiting for a decent sign of spring, short of our daffodils! Well, and our bluebird, I guess I should too be thankful!

C-ingspots said...

Very well said, I couldn't agree more. Spring feels so good when it finally arrives, and brings with it a sense of peace, renewal and satisfaction at having survived yet another long, hard winter. It is definitely an accomplishment when you have all the animals and the hardships to come full circle to yet another anxiously awaited springtime. Enjoy!!

p.s. we are trying the fly predators this year for the first time. Do you recommend them? What has your experience been?

Victoria Cummings said...

Cing - I wholeheartedly recommend the fly predators. We've used them for years and people always comment on how we have NO flies. I sprinkle the contents of the package on little piles of manure that I specifically place in the front and back of the stalls, three or four spots in the corral and at various spots around the edges of the pasture. I also dump some on the manure/compost pile. Then, I leave those "deposits" for a few days until the predator larva have hatched and I see the tiny insects. Each month, I go through the same routine, and it works like a charm. Good luck with them! If you have any questions, come back and ask me.